Tag Archives: asians

Chinese Taipeiback: Dutch Colonists, Pitches are Overthrown

Throwback uniform day was met with mixed reactions from the players.

Throwback uniform day was met with mixed reactions from the players.

Final Score: Chinese Taipei 8, Netherlands 3

World Baseball Conflict of the Game: The Sino-Dutch War of 1661

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Once upon a time, the Kingdom of the Netherlands was one of the most powerful nations in the world. Their small size belied their prodigious talents, and they were able to build an empire on the backs of many non-European peoples.

I am, of course, referring to the Dutch team in the 2009 World Baseball Classic, when the men of Orange twice defeated the Dominican Republic in dramatic fashion to win their pool and advance to the round of eight. Oh, and also the golden age of Dutch naval and mercantile power in the 17th century.

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Kurt Suzuki Farewell Day is Ruined

The crowd stood and cheered as these two great Nationals walked from the bullpen to the dugout. Clearly, they wanted to savor the last time they were going to see one of them. We couldn’t be sure which one, but it’s safe to assume it was Kurt Suzuki.

Final Score: Marlins 9, Nationals 7

Dame of the Game:

Kurt Suzuki: It doesn’t matter what his stat line was. All that matters is the love for him in our hearts.

Shame of the Game:

Tyler Clippard: .2 IP, 3 ER, 3 H, BB, Loss. It does matter what his stat line was, in that its terribleness directly led to the Nats losing the game.

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We could tell from the moment we walked into the stadium that there was a special atmosphere in the crowd. They were excited, but it was a bittersweet excitement. Clearly they expected to witness something great, but they wouldn’t get another chance to see it for a long time. Though we were initially unsure of what that greatness could be, upon seeing the Nationals battery emerge from their bullpen warm up, we knew. People were standing, cheering, giving their adulation to the player who had given them so much joy over the course of this season.

We of course are referring to Kurt Suzuki. Truly the most important cog in the Nationals machine. The cog to end all cogs. No other player could have provoked such a response. The implication was clear: the evening’s game would be the last that Kurt Suzuki would play at Nationals Park, and the fans were saying farewell. We took our seats and watched history unfold. Continue reading

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This Day in Expos History: July 17, 2003

Tomo Ohka was just a blurry man. People would often decide they needed to go the eye doctor after looking at him.

July 17, 2003: Philadelphia Phillies beat Montreal Expos 5-2 in 11 innings.

This one was a real heartbreaker. The boys from Montreal gave everything they had, but couldn’t walk away with a victory. Poor Tomo Ohka, who poured every fiber of his being into that 6 IP/2 R quality start. Think of Brad Wilkerson, who left it all out there on the field when he threw out Pat Burrell at home plate.  Can you find no pity in your cold, cold, feelings-less heart for Wil Cordero, who scampered home to score the game-tying run in the 6th?

And what of Rocky Biddle? Oh Rocky. The Biddler. You never gave up. You never said die. You never put the I in team. You pitched to those two batters in the 9th and 10th, and god damnit you got them out. You sonofabitch. Of course you did.

But all for naught.

All for naught because Tim Drew gave up a three-run, walk-off home run to Marlon Byrd in the bottom of the 11th, sending the Veterans Stadium crowd to their horrible homes happy and leaving the city of Montreal to wallow in anguish.

How could you, Tim Drew. They trusted you. They believed you cared about that team. They thought you’d lay down your life for them; instead, you just lay down.

For shame.

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No Double Plays Defense: Throwback Giants Throw Back Giant Mistake

Santiago Casilla experiments with throwing his shoe to first instead of the baseball, with predictably poor results. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Final Score: Nationals 6, Giants 5

Dame of the Game:

Adam LaRoche: 2-5, RBI, K. I’m not giving this to him because of his near-disastrous-game-winning-should-have-been-inning-ending-double-play ball, but for his successful bunt off Matt Cain in the 4th. Instead of being a stubborn ass-mule like every other left-handed hitter who’s ever been shifted on, he sucked up his “I’m a real man who hunts animals, gets tattoos and never bunts” pride, bunted to the left side, and easily got a hit. I hate every lefty who has never done this obviously correct thing.

Shame of the Game:

Brandon Crawford: No at-bats, Horrible Fielding Mistake That Ended The Game. Thank goodness for Brandon Crawford and his comrade-in-failure Brandon Belt, who Brandoned together to save Adam LaRoche from my hatred and prevent Sean Burnett from having the opportunity to probably blow the game.

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Thursday night was “Turn Back the Clock” night at Nationals Park, and the year that the clock was being turned to was 1924. Consequently, I will tell the story of this game using the important events of 1924 as a metaphor.

January 23: Vladimir Lenin dies; Bottom of the 2nd: Nationals score a run. The Russian Revolution rabble-rouser’s death is good news for American democracy and free enterprise worldwide, but it is marred by the fact that Josef Stalin, who will ultimately begin the Cold War, soon begins consolidating power. Similarly, the small victory of the Nationals going up 1-0 is marred by the fact that it happened on an Ian Desmond-struck double play ball.

February 22:  Calvin Coolidge is sworn in as the President of the United States; 1st-5th innings: Ross Detwiler gives up three runs on 11 hits. Both of these events are decidedly mediocre.

April 1: Hitler’s Beer Hall Putsch; Bottom of the 4th: Adam LaRoche bunts for a hit. Both Hitler’s and LaRoche’s actions were revolutionary, but both ultimately failed at the time. The Putsch was put down and Hitler arrested, and Ian Desmond struck out to end the inning. Continue reading

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